GERMAN PAVILION IN BARCELONA

The Sleeping Beauty of Power:

Contemporary Architecture of Ludwig Mies Van Der Rohe

Article, Architectural Criticism, Harvard' Graduate School of Design

 

Abstract

The studio of Peter Behrens has seen the inauguration of one of the titans of architectural modernism, Ludwig Mies Van Der Rohe. For almost a century, Mies' minimalist style is still widely admired, even by those who are unaware of its origins. Barcelona Pavilion, in particular, could be called as the introduction of Mies’ famous aphorism "less is more" which has influenced contemporary architects for decades. This review article is elaborating on the question WHY! Of this aim, the building is closely investigated. The factors that affect the conceptual design starting from time, purpose, and going through location, perspective, materials, form, and typology are differently analyzed. The article will also discuss and illustrate evidences present in the details of the structure.

An Appraisal of the Migration from Rural to Urban Agglomerations:

ERADICATING POVERTY

PostNOTE, House of Parliament (UK)

 

Abstract

Unaccommodated remarkable population growth in least developed rural areas deepens poverty (Allen, 2007) and increases migration waves (stark et al., 2009) to urban areas. This unplanned migration massively stresses urban infrastructures and services more than any development plan could be able to embrace or afford. The catastrophic impact of such behaviour was endemic until urban areas in developing countries failed to conceive the migration nationally, and the poor were forced to abuse resources in order to survive. The disastrous effect has then become pandemic to affect developed world’ urban areas. This paper will illustrate that developed countries, as they have been negatively impacted by developing countries’ unplanned population growth, have an even greater interest in pursuing more innovative development schemes in rural areas in developing countries, not as an act of generosity, but an act of urgent need. This study shows the impact on some urban agglomerations like London and Paris and concludes that current huge investments in urban communities alone as an approach to improve urban performance have never solved the problem as poor desperately continue to migrate. Even with the use of the most technological development solutions, some immediate problems would be solved, but over time, those solutions will be considered to be ill-advised developments which will lead to greater problems (Report of the World Commission on Environment and Development: Our Common Future, 1987). Seeking to invest in small-scale renewable developments in least developed rural areas will alleviate poverty (Fan et al., 2000) and accommodate the population growth locally as exemplified in practices from Ontario, Canada and Mongolia.

How Could an Urban Sprawl form be Transformed to Embrace Cycling

as a Primary Mode of Transport

THE CASE FOR QUÉBEC

Dissertation - Submitted to Heriot-Watt University

Abstract

Cycling promotes health through physical activity, produces no environmental damage and is economical, both in terms of direct user costs and public infrastructure costs (Pucher and Buehler, 2017). Transforming today’s car-clogged cities to embrace cycling as a primary mode of transport has become demanding than ever (Bruntlett and Bruntlett, 2018). Some cities have been successful in achieving this goal; mostly European, like Amsterdam and Copenhagen, where the number of bikes surpasses the number of people. Dutch and Danish’ experience was inspiring as they have successfully been through the challenge of a deep cultural shift to seamlessly integrate the bicycle into everyday life and to create a whole world of fietsers (‘cyclists’ in Dutch) (Bruntlett and Bruntlett, 2018).

This research aims to contribute towards understanding the elements and factors that play the greatest role in either promoting or hindering cycling as a primary mode of transport within an urban sprawl model like Québec City, Canada. To respond to this aim, five objectives (believed to have the immense impact) are being appraised to apprehend to what extent the capacity of the city of Québec is a prospect for adopting a cycling-oriented transport system: safety, fatality and injury risk; sprawl versus compact and the trip commute time; infrastructure and cycling amenities; bike routes’ integration with public transit; and above all local and regional policies that could pave the way to promote such a sustainable means of transport among commuters. 

 

In order to approach this aim, Québec City is compared to North American cities like New York and Montreal, as well as western European ones like German, Dutch, and Danish cities. As per measures of success and key performance indicators concerning the promotion of cycling, those cities have successful practices that transformed their transport system from auto-centric to active, encouraging inhabitants to ride bikes in a safe and friendly built environment. Québec was analysed using secondary data collected from the government, agencies, not-for-profitorganisation to establish an understanding of what Québec is lacking in order to implement the change it needs, as well as primary data in form of graphical observation to support the evidence of the absence or presence of facilities, equipment, and or infrastructure. Based on the data collected, recommendations to improve cycling-friendliness have been addressed, including replacing car lanes with bike lanes, adding physical barriers, banning cars in the city centre, founding a bike-share system, installing parks, as well as legalising fundamental policy and practice changes. An urgent need to develop a culture of greater respect for cyclists within Québec is also recognised, to raise the societal awareness of issues affecting its actively transporting members and better accommodate their needs.

An Evaluation of the Canadian Housing Situation

Comparative Report with Swiss and Danish Housing

Abstract

This report demonstrates social, economic, political context and remarkable events in which Canada Housing System has developed and been shaped over the past century. Through World War I to the second decade of the 21-century, through the great depression, World War II, and major historical incidents. Illustrating the logical development, and the impact of economic decisions, and political interventions that molded the housing system in Canada.

A light is shed on the recently announced National Housing Strategy, and its strengths. It analyses the current policies, frameworks and agreements by which the government is aiming to achieve its goal of providing such a sustainable housing, to all Canadians. A housing that they can call home. On the other hand, the report presents the current challenges like homelessness and unaffordability, etc. in response to increased migration levels, and the, growing higher year after year, global population. This was supported by factual data to help understand and define the problem, and how to work on a pragmatic solution, and allow us to create a broader vision to embrace the change we have seen.

 

In the last part of the report, a study of two successful - compared to Canadian - housing systems, Swiss and Danish, and light is shed on three policies to adopt in Canada that are believed will help achieve our sustainable development goals, followed by two case studies, one in Vancouver, and another one in Toronto. Both signify the writer’s proposed strategy - if widely implemented – to sustainably solving the intensifying housing crisis in Canada.

Design of Zero Carbon Buildings

Analytical Portfolio 

 

THE JOYCE CENTRE FOR PARTNERSHIP and INNOVATION (JCPI)

Mohawk College of Applied Arts & Technology,

Hamilton, Ontario, Canada

Building Type:                                                         Educational

Approx. Site Area:                                                  8,919 Square Meters

Approx. Gross Internal Floor Area (GIFA):       8,981 Square Meters

Number of storeys:                                               5

Date of Construction:                                           2018

Abstract

This report demonstrates social, economic, political context and remarkable events in which Canada Housing System has developed and been shaped over the past century. Through World War I to the second decade of the 21-century, through the great depression, World War II, and major historical incidents. Illustrating the logical development, and the impact of economic decisions, and political interventions that molded the housing system in Canada.

A light is shed on the recently announced National Housing Strategy, and its strengths. It analyses the current policies, frameworks and agreements by which the government is aiming to achieve its goal of providing such a sustainable housing, to all Canadians. A housing that they can call home. On the other hand, the report presents the current challenges like homelessness and unaffordability, etc. in response to increased migration levels, and the, growing higher year after year, global population. This was supported by factual data to help understand and define the problem, and how to work on a pragmatic solution, and allow us to create a broader vision to embrace the change we have seen.

 

In the last part of the report, a study of two successful - compared to Canadian - housing systems, Swiss and Danish, and light is shed on three policies to adopt in Canada that are believed will help achieve our sustainable development goals, followed by two case studies, one in Vancouver, and another one in Toronto. Both signify the writer’s proposed strategy - if widely implemented – to sustainably solving the intensifying housing crisis in Canada.

Low Impact Development

An Architectural Design to respond to a climate emergency 

 

Abstract

This report will review global policy and legislation; building codes and standards, and case studies of local adoption strategies, Material conservation in construction and how housing architecture can contribute significantly to sustainable development, Buildings’ energy efficiency achievements though social and technical improvements, Water conservation and efficiency in homes, and green infrastructure, particularly, green roofs It will also examine best practices globally and different approaches to climate change mitigation and adaptation and will provide a background from which strong policy can be derived and implemented.

 

The impact of Climate change, and our efforts for mitigation and adaptation have now become a matter of urgency, not of choice. The construction of residential buildings as a result of governments’ commitment to providing affordable sustainable housing to people already accounts for a significant percentage of total energy related emissions and energy consumption of 40% of global energy (UNEP, 2018 p.9; Nejat et al, 2015). The expected increase in global urbanization will only worsen the current situation (UN Habitat, 2013 p. 2). Architectural efficiency is vital through all construction stages, from conceptual design, material selection, waste management, and all the way to operation with regards to their impact on the environment (Spence, R and Mulligan, H, 1995). Elevated water consumption in presence of longer periods of droughts in some areas like African Sahara Desert, and an intensified precipitation that leads to tougher floods, and a total run off in other areas like in France, UK, and Indonesia as a result of the global warming requires our attention. Only fast corrective and preventive actions to reverse serious damages to water sources and the consequences on waste water and sewage output (Randolph and Troy, 2008). As flooding and heatwaves became more common, the permeability of the landscape and the role of green infrastructure, in particular green roofs, are gaining importance (EEA, 2009; Kuronuma, T et al, 2018; EPA, 2015).